CANSA Research

CANSA Research in Action Conference – July 2018 – Poster Session for Students – Trish Muzenda

CANSA Research in Action Conference – July 2018 – Poster Session for Students – Trish Muzenda

The title of the Type A grant to which the abstract relates: Application of personalised medicine using an integrated service and research approach: Evaluation of vitamin D in breast cancer patients.

The name of the PI of the Type A grant to which the abstract relates: Professor Maritha J. Kotze

The title of the degree to which the applicant is working towards: PhD

Abstract:

Comparing prompted and unprompted recall of women’s knowledge of breast and cervical cancer risk factors and symptom

Authors: Trish Muzenda1, Deborah Constant2, Fiona Walter3, Amos Mwaka4, Suzanne Scott5, Jennifer Githaiga2, Jennifer Moodley6.

  1. School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town; Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925, Cape Town, South Africa. Email: trishmuzenda@gmail.com
  2. Women’s Health Research Unit, University of Cape Town; Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925, Cape Town, South Africa.
  3. Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom.
  4. Department of Medicine, Makerere University, Uganda.
  5. Division of Population and Patient Heath, King’s College London, United Kingdom.
  6. Cancer Research Initiative, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town; Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925, Cape, Town, South Africa. Email: jennifer.moodley@uct.ac.za

Introduction:

Breast and cervical cancer are leading causes of cancer morbidity and mortality among African women. Knowledge of breast and cervical cancer is important for developing comprehensive interventions for disease prevention and control. This study seeks to identify breast and cervical cancer risk factor and symptom knowledge through prompted and unprompted recall.

Methods:

The study, conducted in South Africa and Uganda, draws on data collected during psychometric testing of the African Breast and Cervical Cancer Symptom Awareness measurement tool. A structured questionnaire was utilized to obtain data on socio-demographic profiles, risk factors, symptoms awareness and beliefs of women. Unprompted questions were first asked, followed by prompted questions. Socio-demographic characteristics of study participants (n= 139) were described using proportions. Composite knowledge scores (prompted versus unprompted recall) were compared using the two-sample t-test for independent samples. Univariate logistic regression models were used to analyse the odds of recalling each risk factor or symptom in prompted recognition compared with unprompted recall.

Results:

Awareness of evidence-based breast cancer risk factors was poor, with ‘previous history of breast cancer’ being the only factor recognized by more than 50% of women in prompted questioning. Over 60% of women identified non-evidence based beliefs (including putting money in one’s bra) as a risk for breast cancer in prompted questioning. Majority of women recognized multiple sexual partners as a major cervical cancer risk factor, with prompted (96%) questioning compared to only 36% in unprompted questioning. Prompted recall of the classical breast and cervical cancer symptoms was high with most women acknowledging the presence of a breast lump (96%) and smelly vaginal discharge (87%) as signs of disease. However, in unprompted recall, several women (>65%) could not recall most cervical cancer symptoms. Univariate logistic regression analysis is currently in progress and results will be available for presentation.

Discussion:

Findings indicate low knowledge of unprompted breast and cervical cancer symptoms. Important non-evidence based risk factors and symptoms of breast and cervical cancer were identified. Future public awareness interventions should address the awareness of non-evidence-based beliefs and increase knowledge of evidence-based breast and cervical cancer risk factors and symptoms.


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